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Article
May 1943

PAREDRINE HYDROBROMIDE-SULFATHIAZOLE THERAPY OF INFECTIONS OF UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;37(5):713-717. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670030727011
Abstract

Before the introduction of therapy with the sulfonamide compounds there were no satisfactory inhibitors of bacterial growth in the nasal cavity. Silver salts came nearest to solving the problem, but they precipitated and thus clogged the cilia. Argyria occasionally resulted.

The bacteria most frequently observed with infections of the upper respiratory tract, according to Ashley and Frick,1 occur in this order: Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus catarrhalis, Staphylococcus albus, the beta and alpha hemolytic streptococci, Streptococcus foecalis, the influenza bacillus, Bacillus mesentericus and the pneumococcus. Any of these organisms can be responsible for a secondary infection after the initiation of a cold. Sinal infections are usually attributed to the streptococcus, the pneumococcus and the staphylococcus.

Many investigations have shown that sulfathiazole (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-thiazole) is the most effective of the sulfonamide compounds so far studied against the majority of the bacteria present in the nasal cavity. For example, Osgood,2 in his studies on cultures

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