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Article
May 1943

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF PHILADELPHIA, SECTION OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY, AND PHILADELPHIA LARYNGOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;37(5):744-752. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670030758017

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Abstract

Orbital Cellulitis. Dr. Horace James Williams.

Patients with orbital swelling (cellulitis) are likely to be seen at irregular intervals by every otolaryngologist. Knowledge of its anatomic, etiologic, pathologic and clinical features is essential to proper management. Improper conduct of a case may lead to an untimely or inexpedient operation, with impairment or loss of vision, or even to death from meningitis or thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. The present concept of the cause of orbital cellulitis is comparatively new. Such terms as "primary" and "idiopathic" are seldom used in connection with this pathologic condition, while "thrombophlebitis" and "secondary to paranasal sinusitis" have become common.

The most common place in which an abscess may form is between the superior and the mesial bony wall of the orbit and the periorbita. An abscess in this location loosens the periorbita, which strips away easily, and points in the upper lid or on the

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