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Article
June 1943

THE DEVIATED SEPTUM: PHYSICOPHYSIOLOGIC ASPECT

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
From the Otolaryngological Department, New York Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;37(6):789-795. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670030804004
Abstract

Nasal stenosis due to deviation of the septum has received scant attention in the general or specialized medical literature in recent years. Although persons with this abnormality are many, they rarely seek medical advice for it. They learn to disregard it or simply "put up" with it. Not until secondary nasal or systemic complications develop is the physician consulted. The consequences of mechanical nasal obstruction are manifold and not infrequently of serious nature. This, however, is not appreciated by members of the medical profession in general because opinion rather than de facto knowledge is the basis for judgment. Rhinologists consider a submucous resection of the nasal septum a routine measure, for which they have developed their own subjective judgment regarding its indication, as well as its technical execution. Such an attitude tends to depreciate the value of this most beneficial operation and brings confusion into the mind of the student

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