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Article
July 1943

OFFICE NOISES AND THEIR EFFECT ON AUDIOMETRY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;38(1):49-59. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670040058006
Abstract

There is much difference of opinion among otologists, and others who test hearing, concerning the relative value of soundproof or so-called quiet rooms for hearing tests. Some maintain that a soundproof room is necessary, while others go so far as to state that the sense of hearing, which normally is used in a noisy environment, should be tested in the presence of noise. A special committee of otologists, appointed in London in 1929 to study problems concerned with hearing tests, stated, after consideration of the testing environment, that it did "not recommend the use of a silent room for ordinary hearing tests, but that these tests should be carried out in a reasonably quiet room."1 This conclusion, as well as others reported by the committee, was severely criticized by Hallpike2 and others.

Since 1929 advances have been made not only in the different branches of otology, including hearing and its

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