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Article
September 1943

FATE OF LIQUID PETROLATUM INSTILLED INTO THE NOSE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;38(3):241-244. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670040254006
Abstract

The first reported use of petroleum as an oil spray was that by J. Mulvaney,1 an assistant surgeon of the Royal Navy, who used it in a case of laryngitis in 1869. Aulde2 stated that the word "petrolatum" was coined in the 1880 edition of the Pharmacopeia of the United States "to meet a demand on the part of the medical profession for certain proprietary articles which at that time were prepared by a patented process."

Liquid petrolatum was first officially recognized in 1890. Solis-Cohen, discussing Aulde's paper, remarked: "So called Alboline is a useful vehicle for menthol and other agents, to be applied to the respiratory mucous membrane." J. Collins, continuing the discussion (1891), said that when he returned to practice after the Civil War he began "the use of these petroleum products, and since then cosmoline and alboline have been in my office constantly. I use them in

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