[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1943

EFFECTS OF NASAL INHALERS ON ERECTILE TISSUES OF THE NOSE: QUANTITATIVE STUDIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Physiology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;38(4):309-317. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670040323001
Abstract

The introduction of the nasal inhaler into the field of rhinologic therapy has met with widespread acceptance by both the physician and the public. The nasal inhaler offers a simple and inexpensive method of obtaining symptomatic relief from the nasal congestion that accompanies rhinitis. It has the advantages of simplicity of use, compactness and efficiency of response.

Many types of inhalers are now commercially available. Some contain powerful vasoconstrictor drugs, such as amphetamine, while others contain classic rhinologic remedies, such as menthol, camphor and oil of eucalyptus.

Peters and Faulkner1 studied the effects of volatile amphetamine on the pulse, the blood pressure and the electrocardiogram of human subjects with various pathologic conditions. They used doses larger than the therapeutic amounts employed in rhinologic practice. They concluded that the drug produced no significant changes in the pulse or the blood pressure and only slight alterations in the electrocardiogram. They warned, however,

×