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Article
November 1943

LUDWIG'S ANGINA: AN ANATOMIC STUDY OF THE ROLE OF THE LOWER MOLAR TEETH IN ITS PATHOGENESIS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;38(5):485-496. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670040504010
Abstract

Dr. Karl Friedrich Wilhelm von Ludwig1 deserves a permanent place in medical history because he recognized the disease now called by his name as a distinct morbid entity characterized by anatomic, pathologic and clinical signs peculiar to it and differentiating it from lesions closely resembling it. Of course, his assumption that he had met with a new kind of inflammation of the neck of an epidemic character was erroneous.

HISTORY  The disease had been known since classical antiquity and had been mentioned by Hippocrates, Galen, Caelius, Aretæus, Paulus Aegineta, Aurelianus, Severinus and others, and it appears in the later literature under various names. For example, it was classified as "cynanche," "carbunculus gangraenosus," "morbus strangulatorius," "esquinancia gangraenosa," and "angina maligna." The Spaniards called it "garotillo" (after "garote," a loop used by hangmen) and the French "l'esquinancie inflammatoire gangreneuse" (Deberge, 1758) or "phlegmon large du cou" (Dupuytren, 1833). The occurrence of the

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