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Article
November 1943

FOREIGN BODY, JACKSTONE, IN THE ESOPHAGUS: PERFORATION, MEDIASTINITIS, RECOVERY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1943;38(5):502-503. doi:10.1001/archotol.1943.00670040521012

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Abstract

H. McC., aged 2, was brought to Children's Hospital at Denver from Lead, S. D., with a history of having swallowed a jackstone one week previously. Two unsuccessful attempts to remove the foreign body had been made, and as a result the boy was in a serious condition, with high fever and rapid pulse. Physicial examination showed interstitial emphysema of the neck and of the supraclavicular fossae, with some mottling of the skin in the latter regions due to subcutaneous hemorrhage, presumably from a laceration in the esophagus. Roentgenograms showed the presence of a jackstone in the esophagus at the level of the manubrium. Mediastinal emphysema was seen to be present, extending downward around and below the heart and upward into the neck. Roentgenograms taken subsequently, after the patient had ingested a small amount of barium sulfate, showed evidence of an opening in the esophagus, with some of the swallowed

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