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Article
January 1944

CHANGES OF THE TEMPORAL BONE IN LEUKEMIA AND OSTEITIS FIBROSA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Laryngology, Rhinology and Otology of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;39(1):1-13. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680010010001
Abstract

The temporal bone differs from other parts of the skeleton in two respects: It is not subject to direct mechanical influence, and it has anatomic structures peculiar to itself.

To understand better the pathologic changes within the temporal bone one needs to review its anatomy briefly. The most interesting part of the bone from the pathologic standpoint is that which encloses the membranous internal ear. This is called the "pyramid of the temporal bone" or the "capsule of the internal ear." The present study deals chiefly with this aspect of the temporal bone.

STRUCTURE OF THE BONY CAPSULE OF THE INTERNAL EAR  The bony capsule of the internal ear in adults consists of (a) the enchondral layer, (b) the periosteal layer and (c) the endosteal layer.Enchondral Layer.—This layer develops by enchondral ossification of the cartilaginous anlage of the bony capsule. In contradistinction to the enchondral ossification of the long

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