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Article
February 1944

PROPER AND IMPROPER ADMINISTRATION OF OILY NASAL SPRAYS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Service of Dr. John D. Kernan, Department of Otolaryngology, Presbyterian Hospital, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;39(2):124-136. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680010135002
Abstract

Is the intranasal administration of a medicated oil within the limits of normal therapeutic dosage necessarily a dangerous clinical procedure?

Since the first description, by Laughlen,1 in 1925, of lipoid pneumonia following the aspiration of nasal oil drops cautious physicians have been asking themselves this question, with few precise scientific data available from which to draw a reliable conclusion.

Doubtless the widespread abuse of intranasal oils by the public, with the inevitable tendency toward overdosage and too prolonged treatment, has contributed largely to the cloud of suspicion that has developed. An editorial in The Journal of the American Medical Association2 called attention to this consideration with the observation, "There is unanimity of opinion among investigators as to the dangers of intranasal medication with oils, particularly as is seen in the uncontrolled use by the public of the various preparations of liquid petrolatum."

While such self medication cannot be condemned too

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