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Article
March 1944

INTRAVENOUSLY INDUCED ANESTHESIA FOR OPERATIONS ON THE LARYNX UNDER DIRECT LARYNGOSCOPY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Anesthesia (Dr. Adams), the Section on Laryngology, Oral and Plastic Surgery (Dr. New) and the Section on Anesthesia (Drs. Lundy and Seldon), Mayo Clinic.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;39(3):201-202. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680010214001

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Abstract

While many laryngologic operations can be performed under indirect laryngoscopy, the ease with which suspension laryngoscopy can be employed at the present time makes indirect laryngoscopy hardly necessary. Suspension laryngoscopy has certain advantages for both the patient and the surgeon. The patient finds it less trying than indirect laryngoscopy, particularly if he is nervous and excitable. The surgeon, in turn, is not hampered during the operative procedure by spasticity in the patient. This method is particularly valuable when it is necessary to take a specimen of the lesion and wait for a diagnosis on the basis of a fresh, frozen section. If the microscopic diagnosis makes treatment necessary, the whole procedure may be completed at the one time while the patient is still asleep. Most intraoral laryngologic operations at the Mayo Clinic are done employing the induction of anesthesia to be described and using suspension laryngoscopy.

The anesthesia for suspension

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