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Article
June 1944

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURES IN THE NASAL FOSSA, THE MAXILLARY SINUS AND THE TRACHEA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;39(6):504-513. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680010523008
Abstract

A study of atmospheric pressures in the respiratory tract is not new. In the literature I was unable to find any series or group of collected readings of pressures taken. Unfortunately, much of the work has been done on cadavers and mechanically devised apparatus. One finds sufficient theories but few data to substantiate them.

The first part of this paper will concern itself with a series of readings of the changes of atmospheric pressure in the nasal fossa. One of the earliest writers on this subject was Donders.1 He plugged one nostril with a piece of tubing and, with the mouth kept closed, took readings for gentle and forced respiration. He stated that the inspiratory or minus pressure averaged − 9 to − 10 mm. of water, while the expiratory or plus pressure measured + 7 to + 8 mm. He assumed the pressure to be the same throughout the

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