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Article
July 1944

PRESENT STATUS OF DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF MÉNIÈRE'S SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Laryngology, Rhinology and Otology, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;40(1):38-43. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680020050005
Abstract

PATHOLOGY  Ménière's syndrome, according to recent studies, is due to an acute increase of fluid within the internal ear, particularly within the endolymphatic canal of the inferior part of the internal ear.1 These changes will be called "hydrolabyrinth" to emphasize the similarity to hydrocephalus. As in hydrocephalus, probably more than one mechanism can produce hydrolabyrinth.The source and the chemical nature of the excess fluid is not known. Many investigators believe that the increase of fluid is due to hypersecretion and perhaps delayed resorption of endolymph. I2 have advanced the opinion that the fluid escapes from dilated and permeable blood vessels. Hydrolabyrinth may resolve without injury to the internal ear. If the attacks are severe or prolonged, however, two permanent and final changes will eventually result, namely: (1) a fixed dilatation of a smaller or a greater part of the inferior portion of the internal ear, which I3 described although

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