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Article
August 1944

CARCINOMA OF THE LARYNX: A REVIEW OF TREAMENT AND END RESULTS AT THE BROOKLYN CANCER INSTITUTE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;40(2):133-138. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680020169007
Abstract

The most significant prognostic factor in any case of laryngeal carcinoma appears to be the exact site of origin of the lesion. The significance of this factor seems to be due to the fact that the supporting matrix beneath the mucosal surface of the vocal cords is made up of a dense fibrous connective tissue with little or no lymph drainage while the supporting structure beneath the epithelium of the extrinsic larynx is that of a loose areolar tissue rich in lymph supply (Lore1). In most cases an epithelial new growth arising in or about the larynx is squamous cell carcinoma. It is true that there is a variation as to maturity of structure and that acanthoma more usually arises on a vocal cord. Harris and

Fig. 1.—Laryngeal air passage as seen in a coronal section.

Klemperer2 stated that "histologic structure is of minor importance in determining the radiosensitivity of

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