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Article
September 1944

A NEW NASOPHARYNGEAL RADIUM APPLICATOR

Author Affiliations

FLINT, MICH.
From Hurley Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;40(3):208-209. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680020262014
Abstract

Crowe and Baylor1 first described the treatment of middle ear deafness due to lymphoid vegetation of the eustachian tube in 1939. The results which they reported at that time focused attention on the radiation treatment of middle ear deafness, particularly that in children. In their work they made use of radon. There are certain disadvantages in the use of radon that are at once apparent. Owing to the fact that there are comparatively few emanation plants in the country, the average otologist will have to plan the time for the Radium element therefore appears to be the best for this treatment, because of its stability. Roentgen rays have likewise been used successfully but have the disadvantage that their application cannot be localized as can the radiation from a radium applicator placed directly on the orifice of the eustachian tube. Farrior and Richardson2 described a nasopharyngeal applicator in May 1942. This

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