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Article
September 1944

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF PHILADELPHIA, SECTION ON OTOLARYNGOLOGY, AND PHILADELPHIA LARYNGOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;40(3):229-231. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680020283017

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Abstract

SYMPOSIUM ON CHEMOTHERAPY AND BIOTHERAPY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY 

Chemotherapy. Presented by Dr. Daniel S. Cunning (by invitation).  During the past ten years great strides have been made in the treatment of suppurative disease of the ear, nose and throat by means of chemotherapy. Although we have heard a great deal about the sulfonamide drugs and penicillin of late, chemotherapy itself is not new. The first chemotherapeutic agent dates back to the fourteenth century, when mercury was brought out for the treatment of syphilis. In the fifteenth century quinine was given to the medical profession for the treatment of malaria. Nothing further was done along this line of therapy for almost five hundred years. Then, in 1910, Ehrlich introduced arsphenamine for the treatment of syphilis. In this same year Gelmo discovered sulfanilamide but did not apply it clinically. It remained for Domagk, in 1932, to notice the potency of sulfanilamide in combating

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