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Article
October 1944

BILATERAL ACOUSTIC NEURITIS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE AND A REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1944;40(4):261-265. doi:10.1001/archotol.1944.00680020337003
Abstract

The causes of acoustic neuritis discussed in the literature have been varied, each stressed in turn over a period of years. Focal infection from tonsillitis or a dental abscess, diphtheria, meningitis or some other acute infectious disease, vitamin deficiency and the toxic effects of such drugs as quinine, arsenic, the salicylates and possibly the sulfonamide compounds have been designated as causes of acoustic neuritis in cases in which this condition was proved present.

Auditory neuritis was described by Wintermute1 in 1915 as a disease coming on suddenly which produces tinnitus and deafness when the cochlear branch is affected, vertigo, disturbances of equilibrium, spontaneous nystagmus and vomiting when the vestibular branch suffers and a combination of these symptoms when both branches are involved. He stated that the disease is due to syphilis in the great majority of instances but concedes that alcoholism, drug poisoning from quinine or the salicylates and even

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