[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1945

DETERMINATIONS OF INTRANASAL pH: A DISCUSSION AND CRITICISM

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1945;41(1):68-70. doi:10.1001/archotol.1945.00680030091007
Abstract

Confusion is evident in such experiments as have been reported for the determination of intranasal pH. The cause seems to lie chiefly in unawareness that within the nasal chambers are two distinct sources of hydrogen ion concentration: living tissue and nonliving secretion. The purpose of this discussion is to suggest a more valid premise for such experimentation. It is hoped that with this premise more accurate and therefore more useful conclusions may be drawn.

In the opening paragraphs of his "Introduction to Comparative Biochemistry" Baldwin1 stated: "In the body of the animal the properties of the perfusing fluid are kept remarkably constant. The total salinity, the pH and the temperature remain constant within very small limits. A large part of physiology is concerned with the mechanism whereby this constancy is maintained."

The term "body fluid" embraces both cellular and extracellular fluids, which together comprise the liquid content of the tissues.

×