[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1945

THROMBOSIS OF A CAVERNOUS SINUS TREATED WITH PENICILLIN AND HEPARIN

Arch Otolaryngol. 1945;41(4):295-297. doi:10.1001/archotol.1945.00680030322008
Abstract

Cure of thrombosis of a cavernous sinus prior to the advent of sulfonamide compounds was exceptional. Schall1 advocated the combined use of heparin and chemotherapy, with a resultant increase in the number of cures over that with the use of sulfonamide compounds alone. In the case to be reported, in which sulfadiazine apparently was not benefiting the patient, immediate and marked improvement resulted from the use of penicillin and heparin in the presence of a Staphylococcus aureus infection.

REPORT OF A CASE  A white man aged 25 entered a regional station hospital on Feb. 28, 1944 with a diagnosis of cellulitis of the nose. His chief complaint was swelling of the nose for four days. Ten days before entry he contracted a "cold," with nasal discharge and stuffiness. There was no history of trauma. On the day before admission he was seen as an outpatient, and an impression of herpes

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×