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Article
May 1945

EFFECT OF AIRCRAFT NOISE ON HEARING

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1945;41(5):327-332. doi:10.1001/archotol.1945.00680030356003
Abstract

There has appeared recently a series of reports emphasizing the high incidence and the severity of hearing defects among personnel returning from combat. In addition, there have been statements as to the large numbers of Air Forces personnel who would return as "ear cripples" after the termination of the present conflict.

Because marked divergence of opinion exists concerning the incidence and the character of these impairments among Air Forces personnel and the extent to which they may be attributed to aircraft noise, I should like to discuss some of the more recent developments in the present knowledge of this subject.

First, what are the characteristics of aircraft noise? Consider the cockpit of the plane in flight. This is essentially a closed chamber, separated from the outside air by only the thin wall of the fuselage, within which are seated one or more persons. Since the principal sources of noise (the

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