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Article
August 1945

DEAFNESS: ITS CAUSES AND WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT IT

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Departments of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1945;42(2):144-146. doi:10.1001/archotol.1945.00680040180008
Abstract

Eleven years ago, at a meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, I read a paper entitled "Animal Experimentation on Hearing: Its Clues to the Prevention of Deafness."1 Since then a great deal of experimentation on deafness has been done with both animals and human beings as subjects. In the past three years extensive experimental work has been carried on as a result of demands for answers to problems raised by the war. Again the question is asked, "What is deafness, and what can otologists do for it?"

This question divides itself, as always, into two components: (1) the problem of deafness due to mechanical causes, that is, to obstructive conditions that prevent sound from reaching the sense organ or the organ of Corti (middle ear deafness), and (2) the problem of deafness due to changes occurring in the sense organ and the cochlear nerve (nerve deafness). These

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