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Article
January 1946

CLINICAL USE OF PENICILLIN IN INFECTIONS OF THE EARS, NOSE AND THROAT

Arch Otolaryngol. 1946;43(1):12-16. doi:10.1001/archotol.1946.00680050022002
Abstract

Penicillin became available for general clinical use in the United States Naval Hospital at Portsmouth, Va., in the fall of 1943. Its use in the treatment of infections of the ears, the nose and the throat was at first limited to severe infections which had failed to respond to treatment with sulfonamide compounds and other therapeutic measures and which were due to sensitive organisms. In the past few months, as the drug has become more available, it has been used in the average "run-of-the-mill" cases of such diseases as acute tonsillitis, acute maxillary sinusitis and acute or chronic otitis media. Consequently, this study comprises observations on approximately 100 cases, which can be divided into two groups—one representing some of the serious and difficult problems of therapy, and the other group, problems that are more ordinary but not always simple.

Penicillin is a specific agent, effective only against certain organisms, but

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