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Article
July 1946

EFFECT OF LABYRINTHINE REFLEXES ON THE VEGETATIVE NERVOUS SYSTEMA Review

Arch Otolaryngol. 1946;44(1):61-72. doi:10.1001/archotol.1946.00680060072006
Abstract

THE second World War has revived the interest in seasickness and airsickness. The chief signs and symptoms of these syndromes are vegetative disturbances such as vasomotor reactions, pallor of the face, perspiration, nausea and vomiting (Byrne1). Although it is recognized that seasickness is due chiefly to abnormal excitation of the labyrinth (Kreidl2 and James3) and a similar assumption is rather probable for airsickness (Armstrong4), symptomatologic clinical studies alone are insufficient in order to decide whether the aforementioned vegetative symptoms are secondary effects of vertigo and the associated emotional corticodiencephalic reactions or whether they are the direct reflex effect of excitation of the nonacoustic inner ear. Experiments on animals are able to demonstrate the reflex nature of the majority of these vegetative reactions.

VASOMOTOR REACTIONS  The certain evidence that stimulation of the labyrinth leads to a vasomotor reaction is furnished by experiments in which the blood pressure in rabbits was recorded

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