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Article
January 1947

EFFECT OF OBLITERATION OF THE ENDOLYMPHATIC SAC AND DUCT IN THE MONKEY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Otolaryngology of the University of Chicago.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1947;45(1):1-13. doi:10.1001/archotol.1947.00690010008001
Abstract

THE DISCOVERY by Hallpike and Cairns1 that the clinical syndrome known as Ménière's disease is based on anatomicopathologic changes in the inner ear, the most striking of which is dilatation or hydrops of the endolymphatic system, has directed attention to the physiology of the secretion and maintenance of endolymph.

The anatomic structures within the endolymphatic system which on the basis of structure have been considered by early anatomists to be adapted for secretion and removal of endolymph are the stria vascularis in the cochlear duct and the endolymphatic duct and sac.

Guild2 performed experiments in which he injected a mixture of potassium ferrocyanide and iron–ammonium citrate into the basal turn of the cochlear duct in guinea pigs and demonstrated the blue granules in the walls of the endolymphatic sac. He concluded that endolymph flows from the cochlear duct to the endolymphatic duct and sac.

Anson and Wilson3

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