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Article
August 1947

MALIGNANT MELANOMA OF THE NASAL MUCOSA

Author Affiliations

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1947;46(2):195-210. doi:10.1001/archotol.1947.00690020204006
Abstract

IN THE study of oncology, melanomas, the group of tumors characterized by melanin-pigmented cells, form a distinctive class of neoplasms that present vexing problems of remarkable interest, with wide differences of opinion regarding their origin and nature. These tumors may be innocuous or malignant. The benign tumor is commonly called a nevus or mole. The malignant tumor, frequently called a malignant melanoma and sometimes a melanotic sarcoma, is in practice generally designated simply as a melanoma, according to Boyd1; the old term "melanotic sarcoma" is a misnomer, for the tumor is not a sarcoma. Ewing2 regarded the attempt to identify this tumor with carcinoma or sarcoma as undesirable. He advocated employment of the term "melanoma" to emphasize the specific character of the tumor cells and suggested that the possibility that a tumor of this type has its origin from epidermal cells be indicated by the term "melanocarcinoma" and a sarcomatous

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