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Article
September 1947

THE VESTIBULAR APPARATUS AS AN ORGAN OF SENSE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1947;46(3):386-389. doi:10.1001/archotol.1947.00690020397012
Abstract

IT IS a striking fact, as I explained in more detail in another place,1 that one encounters the same signs, reactions and other phenomena in the examination of the pathologic vestibular apparatus as one is accustomed to observe in the examination of the normal apparatus-but exaggerated, sometimes even excessive. It is quite understandable that one does not always find in a single case all the known vestibular phenomena, e. g., tonic body reflexes, nystagmus and dizziness, at the same time. Usually one or more of these symptoms is the main feature of the disease.

From these facts one may conclude, first, that when one examines the vestibular apparatus of the normal person, all the extant phenomena, such as vertigo, body reflexes and nystagmus, endanger the equilibrium and are normally and physiologically quickly suppressed. Every normal person has in his central nervous system some physiologic checking mechanism which protects the endangered

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