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Article
September 1947

TYROTHRICIN IN THE TREATMENT OF THE COMMON COLD

Arch Otolaryngol. 1947;46(3):395-397. doi:10.1001/archotol.1947.00690020406014
Abstract

OF ALL the annoying and nonfatal diseases which plague mankind, the most frequent is the common cold. That it is not entirely harmless must be recognized. It takes a tremendous economic toll each year, causing the loss of more man—hours among the workers of this country than any other disease. It is often the predecessor of far more serious ailments; notably pneumonia, sinusitis, bronchitis, otitis media and mastoiditis. If it does not confine people to bed, it accounts for a great deal of discomfort and a loss of considerable efficiency for at least two weeks out of the average man's year.

Much time and money have been expended in attempts to determine its cause. Countless remedies have been tried for its prevention and treatment. The net result of all these endeavors has been so unsatisfactory that the subject has long been a fertile field for cartoons and jokes at the

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