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Article
January 1948

CHEMICAL MENINGITIS FOLLOWING USE OF TYROTHRICIN: A Clinical and Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1948;47(1):21-28. doi:10.1001/archotol.1948.00690030028003
Abstract

TYROTHRICIN, a bactericidal substance, has been known since 1939, when it was first discovered by Dubos,1 who the following year2 elaborated on its effect in experimental bacterial infections. His description was rapidly followed by numerous clinical trials, which have been enthusiastically recorded in the medical literature from 1941 to the present time. Its effectiveness when it is used locally in the treatment of infections of the nasal sinuses and the mastoid process has been repeatedly pointed out by Crowe and his associates.3 The toxic and the pharmacologic properties of the new agent were early studied by Herrell and Heilman,4 Rammelkamp and Weinstein5 and Robinson and his associates.6 In general, the material was shown to be markedly toxic (mostly by hemolysis) when used intravenously or by other injection method. In animal experiments its use was limited to surface application, on infected areas, or to irrigation of infected body cavities. It was

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