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Article
February 1948

SOME CLINICAL PHENOMENA OF DEAFNESS IN THE LIGHT OF NEW AND OLD TESTS OF THE EAR

Author Affiliations

EDGWARE, MIDDLESEX, ENGLAND

Arch Otolaryngol. 1948;47(2):113-118. doi:10.1001/archotol.1948.00690030122001
Abstract

THE unbiased reader of modern publications on functional tests of hearing cannot escape the conclusion that audiometry has conquered the field of hearing tests and that the tuning forks are doomed to be shelved as obsolete instruments, as interesting curiosities of otologic history. G. E. Shambaugh,1 who took a critical view of hyperenthusiasm about the increasing monopoly of audiometry in 1930, was not mentioned among the numerous references in Bunch's work on "Clinical Audiometry,"2 in 1943. I, who have taken an active part in the development of functional tests of the ear since 1902 and found the opportunity to study audiometry on a large material since 1938, am the last to deny the revolutionary importance of audiometry, but I feel that a sound constructive antithesis of old and new tests might still be indicated and perhaps helpful in the approach to the problem of deafness, especially that of congenital deafness.

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