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Article
July 1948

PH OF NASAL SECRETION IN SITU IN INFANTS AND IN CHILDREN: The Effect of Hyperventilation and Crying

Arch Otolaryngol. 1948;48(1):67-72. doi:10.1001/archotol.1948.00690040074009
Abstract

HYPERVENTILATION is so common that its importance is frequently overlooked. Increased pulmonary ventilation is due to an increase of either the rate or the depth of respiration or of both. Thus, every person will at some time find himself in a state of hyperventilation as a result of stimulation of the respiratory center due to mental or emotional excitement, or to pain, heat or cold reflexes, or to conditions which increase the demand of the tissues for oxygen, e. g., muscular exercise. In contrast, hyperventilation is also seen in a wide variety of clinical conditions.

Under normal circumstances there is a reservoir of carbon dioxide in the alveoli of the lungs—a phenomenon considered essential to the well-being of the body. Chemical reactions of the body are quickly altered by changes in the concentration of the carbon dioxide in alveolar air. Decrease in the concentration of carbon dioxide in alveolar air

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