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Article
August 1948

LYMPHOID EUSTACHIAN SALPINGITIS: ITS EFFECT ON TUBAL PATENCY: Selective Criteria for Nasopharyngeal Irradiation

Author Affiliations

TAMPA, FLA.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1948;48(2):221-232. doi:10.1001/archotol.1948.00690040230010
Abstract

LYMPHOID eustachian salpingitis, or lymphoid tubotympanitis, may be defined as any lymphoid hyperplasia in or about the eustachian tube which interferes with the physiologic opening of the tube and produces symptoms referable to the middle ear. It is usually associated with a chronic catarrhal inflammatory process.

Since the work of Crowe and Baylor,1 this entity has been widely treated by the nasopharyngeal application of radium or radon. As shown in figure 1 and tabulated by Boies,2 the radium applicators deliver a maximum dose on contact and an ineffectual minimum of radiation at a distance of 5 mm. Therefore, they can be of primary value only in the treatment of disease occurring in the immediate neighborhood of the pharyngeal orifice of the eustachian tube. Obstruction in the peripheral portion can be more advantageously treated with high voltage roentgen rays.

If radiation is to be used judiciously in the treatment of lymphoid

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