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Article
August 1948

INDUCTION OF ANESTHESIA WITH THIOPENTAL SODIUM IN TONSILLECTOMY

Author Affiliations

OTTAWA, CANADA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1948;48(2):238-243. doi:10.1001/archotol.1948.00690040247012
Abstract

THIS paper is a short note on my experiences with the intravenous administration of thiopental sodium (pentothal sodium®) in tonsillectomy in the past two years.

Intravenous anesthesia was rightly adopted only with considerable caution by members of the medical profession, as on theoretic grounds there were serious objections at first. There was a very real danger of injecting too much of the drug and of being unable to reverse the process. Some of the earlier derivatives of the barbiturates were much more slowly eliminated than those in use today. Thiopental sodium was introduced to the medical profession in 1934 and has the advantages of rapid action and relatively short duration. It is broken down rapidly, partly in the liver, and is excreted by the kidneys in an unidentified form. It is unlike the slower-acting barbiturates, a good deal of which may be excreted from the kidney unchanged over a period

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