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Article
May 1949

HEMANGIOMA OF THE EAR AND MASTOID PROCESS: Report of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1949;49(5):535-546. doi:10.1001/archotol.1949.03760110091007
Abstract

MOORE,1 in his "Textbook of Pathology," described hemangiomas and divided them into three classes: hemartomatous hemangiomas, hemangioblastomas and sclerosing hemangiomas. In writing of the first group he described the pathogenesis as follows:

... If, during development, a small mass of vascular tissue is misplaced or distorted, it may persist as a tumor. With the growth of the body the mass will become evident. Because of stagnation of blood, trauma, or other factors, new vessels form and enlarge the total mass more rapidly than the body as a whole.

He described two types of the hemartomatous hemangiomas: the capillary type, which is made up of numerous small capillaries separated by moderately cellular connective tissue, and the cavernous type, made up of widely dilated channels separated by trabeculae and most often seen in muscle, bone and liver. In the cases reviewed, 3 were reported to be of the last-mentioned type.2

The

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