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Article
June 1949

ROLE OF ALLERGY IN THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE COMMON COLD

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1949;49(6):575-586. doi:10.1001/archotol.1949.03760120002001
Abstract

ALTHOUGH the virus is generally accepted as the causative organism of the common cold, much obscurity exists concerning the role of contributory factors, such as exposure to cold, fatigue and debility. These elements of one's environment have been much discussed in the literature, so that only a brief résumé will be necessary here. The purpose of this paper, however, is to suggest another factor, allergy, which will be discussed in relation to factors already known.

THE CASE OF EXPOSURE TO COLD  Since time immemorial, chilling has been considered a factor in the pathogenesis of the common cold. The Germans express this thought in the term Erkältung. Certain investigators1 had noted changes in the nasal mucosa of persons exposed to heat and cold, but none of these investigators produced laboratory evidence of these changes until Mudd and his associates2 published their work. They then showed that cutaneous chilling causes

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