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Article
November 1949

ACUTE DEAFNESS IN SCARLATINA

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1949;50(5):589-604. doi:10.1001/archotol.1949.00700010603005
Abstract

IT IS AN old experience that occasionally a child with scarlatina may become acutely deaf and eventually deaf-mute. The acute deafness in these instances is thought to be caused by purulent panotitis or, according to the observations of Wittmaack,1 by neuritis of the cochlear nerve. Manasse2 was the first to emphasize that acute deafness in scarlatina may be caused by diffuse purulent labyrinthitis on one side and serous labyrinthitis on the other. In the case of Manasse2 there was necrotic otitis media on both sides, which had caused diffuse purulent labyrinthitis on the left, and on the right, localized purulent labyrinthitis in the round window; this, in turn, had caused diffuse serous labyrinthitis. This type of serous labyrinthitis has been called "secondary" by Ruttin3 because it originates from localized purulent labyrinthitis. It must be distinguished from "induced" diffuse serous labyrinthitis, in which there is no purulent

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