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Article
November 1949

DENTAL CONSIDERATIONS IN FITTING HEARING AID EAR INSERTS

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

From the Hearing Clinic of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1949;50(5):659-665. doi:10.1001/archotol.1949.00700010673013
Abstract

ABOUT three quarters of a million hearing aids are sold annually in the United States, and the medical literature contains many articles concerned with the proper technic of fitting them. It is now generally agreed that if a hearing aid is to be used in aural rehabilitation it must be tailored to measure to give optimum results in each particular case.

An important part of this custom tailoring process is the fitting of the ear piece, or insert. In recent years it has been recognized that personal ear fittings must be used to get the best air conduction reception. Lederer and Hardy1 found that a poorly fitting ear insert may lessen the efficiency of a vacuum tube hearing aid by as much as 20 decibels. They conclude: "Nor can too much emphasis be placed on the care with which the 'tailoring' of the ear mold is done." This is

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