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Article
April 1950

SOME EFFECTS OF THE COMMON COLD ON SPEECH

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;51(4):500-513. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700020523003
Abstract

FREQUENTLY heard are remarks which imply that when one has a cold one's speech sounds "different." This commonly alleged difference has evidently been so generally accepted that scientific investigators have not been stimulated to evaluate it; at least, a search that I made through the literature revealed few observations other than what might be furnished by any man on the street. I felt that some attempt should be made to obtain more definite information about the influence a cold might have on speech not only because of the frequency of opportunities that any such relationship has to exert itself, but also because information concerning it might add to the understanding of other voice problems. By way of initiating such an attempt, a number of victims of coryza were found and several possible effects of that condition on their speech were studied. The purpose of this paper is to report findings

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