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Article
May 1950

HEATING OF THE HUMAN MAXILLARY SINUS BY MICROWAVES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the departments of otolaryngology and physical medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;51(5):678-684. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700020703005
Abstract

THE ABILITY to heat the human paranasal sinuses has been a long sought after objective. Limited success has been obtained with the use of infra-red, conventional and short wave diathermy as the heating agent.1 Since the end of World War II microwaves have been added to the heating armamentarium. Perfection of the magnetron tube made the generation of microwaves possible.

In 1948, Osborne and Frederick2 reported the use of microwaves to produce a marked temperature rise in the frontal sinus of the dog. In view of these experiments, it was thought advisable to undertake experiments to determine whether the intra-antral temperature of human subjects might be similarly increased.

Since 1947 experimental data have been presented to show that microwaves can produce a significant rise in temperature in living tissues. Microwaves differ from short wave diathermy currents in that, apart from their extremely high frequency, they possess optical properties

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