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Article
May 1950

SITE OF LESION IN PARALYSIS OF TWELFTH AND/OR SEVENTH CRANIAL NERVE

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Departments of Neurology and Otolaryngology, Cincinnati General Hospital and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;51(5):739-749. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700020764011
Abstract

INTERESTING observations in a case of bilateral complete paralysis of the tongue (panglossoplegia) were the occasion for these studies. New information resulting therefrom is presented concerning particular aspects of the neural and muscular mechanisms responsible for certain movements of the tongue and of the lips. On the basis of these findings in correlation with known anatomic factors differential topognosis of the lesion in instances of hypoglossal and/or facial nerve paralysis is discussed.

REPORT OF A CASE  A 57 year old white housewife was referred to the Cincinnati General Hospital by her family physician on Feb. 2, 1947 because of inability to chew, to swallow and, particularly, to talk in an understandable manner. It was the opinion of her physician that all her troubles were caused by a complete bilateral paralysis of the tongue. The illness had started in November 1945, with difficulty in pronouncing all the linguals and certain of

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