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Article
June 1950

USE OF SPEECH TESTS FOR EVALUATION OF CLINICAL PROCEDURES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Central Institute for the Deaf.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;51(6):786-797. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700020812002
Abstract

IN THE past decade interest in clinical auditory tests has been greatly stimulated by a wide, although not wholly unrelated, variety of factors. The more significant among these factors are the development of electroacoustic instruments, which make possible increasingly refined measurements; growing interest in the fenestration operation; expanding consumer acceptance of improved hearing aids; evolution of promising technics of research in psychoacoustics, and, finally, but none the less stimulating, the encouraging cooperative attack by workers from allied fields on the problems presented by aural rehabilitation.

From the standpoint of clinical technics employed, auditory tests fall into three broad categories: (1) tuning fork, (2) pure tone audiometry and (3) articulation tests.1 Although the evolution of these tests overlap somewhat in time, the order in which they are presented represents basically the sequence of their refined development. The basic principles of articulation testing have not been implemented universally in routine otologic practice,

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