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Article
July 1950

OTOLARYNGOLOGIC DISEASES IN PATIENTS WITH CLINICAL AVITAMINOSIS

Author Affiliations

WATERBURY, CONN.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;52(1):58-69. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700030077008
Abstract

WORLD War II provided an opportunity for acquiring more knowledge of the possible relation of vitamin deficiencies to the diseases commonly seen by the otolaryngologist. Since frank avitaminosis is a rarity in everyday life, the opportunity is lacking in the usual practice of otolaryngology for examination in such cases. Much of the discussion on the role of vitamins in this field has been concerned with subclinical avitaminosis.

I became interested in 1941 in the relation of vitamins to the therapy of deafness. Thiamine hydrochloride and the other factors of the vitamin B complex preparations had been receiving much attention in the treatment of disorders of the eighth nerve. Shambaugh and Jennes1 reported that uniformly negative results were obtained in a series of cases of nerve deafness and tinnitus aurium with treatment by intravenous administration of thiamine hydrochloride. From these results it was concluded that there was no evidence in favor

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