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Article
September 1950

CHEMICAL BURNS OF THE ORAL CAVITY AND ESOPHAGUS

Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;52(3):419-426. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700030441009
Abstract

CHEMICAL burns of the oral cavity and esophagus are widespread in the southeastern European countries. This condition is especially prevalent in Hungary and the Balkan countries. In Western Europe there are fewer cases. From 1903 to 1923 Guisez in France had seen only 169 of such cases. The long fight led by Chevalier Jackson to secure the proper labels on containers of lye has greatly decreased the number of burns from lye and caustics in the United States.1

At the otolaryngologic clinic of the University of Sofia (Bulgaria) there were 1,221 cases of chemical burns for a period of about twenty years (1928 to 1947). At this clinic much time has been devoted to the study of the pathology of these burns and various methods of treatment have been applied. Lye was responsible for most of the chemical burns of the oral cavity and the esophagus—979 cases. If lye were

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