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Article
December 1950

TYMPANOMEATAL MEMBRANE IN THE FENESTRATION OPERATION: Its Relation to Bony Closure of the Fenestra

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Otolaryngology and Radiology, Mount Sinai Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1950;52(6):930-934. doi:10.1001/archotol.1950.00700030957009
Abstract

THE EVOLUTION of otosclerosis surgery in America received its first impetus in 1937, when Sourdille,1 professor of otolaryngology at the University of Strasbourg, described his fenestration operation at the New York Academy of Medicine. Sourdille's work was inspired by watching Holmgren operate for otosclerosis in 1924. Attempts at fenestration of the labyrinth for otosclerotic deafness had been made by Passow2 in 1896, Jenkins3 in 1912 and Bárány4 in 1914. Holmgren5 in 1916 proved that the membranous labyrinth could be exposed without endangering the cochlea and that improvement in hearing could be achieved in properly selected cases of deafness due to otosclerosis. Lempert6 in 1938 made a monumental contribution when he described the one stage fenestration operation. Osteogenetic closure of the operative fenestra has always been and still is the chief obstacle to the success of the fenetration. Recently, the contributions of Lempert and associates,7 G. E. Shambaugh Jr. and Juers,8

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