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Article
January 1951

STREPTOMYCIN THERAPY IN LARYNGEAL TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

HOUSTON, TEXAS
From the Department of Otolaryngology, Baylor University College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;53(1):1-26. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750010018001
Abstract

INVOLVEMENT of the larynx with tuberculosis has long been regarded as a rather grave complication of the original pulmonary disease,1 and at one time patients with such laryngeal complications were barred from many of the various sanatoriums.1a Advanced pulmonary tuberculosis is practically always the forerunner of laryngeal disease, primary laryngeal tuberculosis apparently being extremely rare.2

Our knowledge of laryngeal tuberculosis can be traced back as far as Morgagni.2b,c However, real progress in understanding this disease was first made in the early nineteenth century by three great clinicians; Louis, Laennec and Trousseau.2c Even the medical student is familiar with some of the work and contributions of these masters of observation and physical diagnosis.

Attention to the larynx in the living patient assumed increasing importance after the introduction of the laryngeal mirror by the London singing teacher, Manuel Garcia, about 1855.2d A much more accurate study

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