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Article
March 1951

LYMPH VESSELS IN THE WALL OF THE ENDOLYMPHATIC SAC

Author Affiliations

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK
From the Ear Clinic of the Kommune Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;53(3):290-295. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750030049005
Abstract

WITHIN recent years, much research has been devoted to the problem of the anatomy and physiology of the endolymphatic sac (Guild,1 Bast,2 Anson and Nesselrod,3 Anson and Wilson,4 Doi,5 Siirala,6 Secretan,7 Altmann and Waltner,8 Lindsay,9 H. C. Andersen,10 Engstrøm and Hjorth11).

Most writers agree that the endolymph is absorbed from the sac. This view is based on a series of experimental observations, which will be discussed later. The details, however, of this process of absorption are as yet unknown. Mygind12 (1948) takes the view that certain highly molecular proteins are decomposed within the sac, whereas the low molecular ones are absorbed directly from the entire surface of the endolymphatic system.

The decomposition within the sac is assumed, by Mygind, to occur by means of large wandering cells—histiocytes—which are usually found in a copious number in the lumen of

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