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Article
June 1951

EXOSTOSIS OF THE EXTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;53(6):668-669. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750060063009
Abstract

EXOSTOSES of the external auditory canal vary in size and may be single or multiple. They are relatively frequent, occurring chiefly in late adolescence or early adult life. Men are more subject to these growths than women. Growths large enough to obstruct the canal will cause partial deafness and constitute a serious hazard when middle ear suppuration is present.1 Secondary inflammation of the cutaneous canal may be caused by pressure of the growths against the opposing wall. Cerumen tends to collect in the narrow slitlike openings.2

The cause of this pathological change is unknown in the majority of cases, and the reader is referred to the standard textbooks on otolaryngology for a discussion of the theories of etiology. The case presented here is secondary to trauma. It may have been the result of a local periostitis alone or in conjunction with a fracture.

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