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Article
July 1951

TRANSTYMPANIC INJECTION OF ANESTHETICS FOR THE TREATMENT OF MÉNIÈRE'S SYNDROME

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;54(1):43-52. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750070060005
Abstract

THERE seems to be some controversy in the literature concerning the precise nomenclature for the attacks of labyrinthine vertigo originally described by Ménière and often combined with tinnitus and impairment of hearing.

Older authors applied the term Ménière's disease to this symptom complex, while more recent workers prefer to refer to it as Ménière's syndrome. Certainly, we all agree that the most prominent symptom in Ménière's syndrome is the vertigo which may originate in the inner ear, in the vestibular nerve, in the cerebellopontile angle, or in the central nervous system. A functional factor, psychosomatic mechanisms, or malingering may also play an important role.1

The etiological basis of Ménière's symptom complex is not definitely known, and many causes are ascribed, such as the following: vascular disturbances (abnormal permeability of the capillaries, disturbances of lymph circulation leading to hydrops of the labyrinth, vascular spasms), allergic conditions with increased sensitivity to

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