[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1951

NEUROFIBROSARCOMA OF THE FACIAL NERVE INVOLVING THE TYMPANOMASTOID

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Otolaryngology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, and Henrotin Hospital.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;54(2):162-166. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750080050005
Abstract

NEOPLASMS of the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve are extremely rare. A careful search of the literature has revealed but 17 cases.1 With the exception of a malignant neurogenic spindle-cell sarcoma reported by Kettel1a in the November, 1950, issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology, all cases have presented the histologic picture of benign neurinoma. This report is concerned with a second case of malignant neurofibrosarcoma, that of a patient who has remained well since being observed and operated on by one of us (M. R. G.) in 1942 The rarity of the condition and the unusual life expectancy in spite of the histologic evidences of malignancy prompt this report.

Neurinomas may involve any peripheral or cranial nerve. Virchow, in his classic treatise on tumors, classified all neoplasms involving nerves or nerve tissue as neuromas. It remained for von Recklinghausen, in his histologic studies, to show that these

×