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Article
September 1951

PHYSICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL VARIABLES IN NOISE-INDUCED HEARING LOSS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
Dr. Wheeler is Field Representative, Sub-Committee on Noise in Industry of the Committee on Conservation of Hearing, American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;54(3):267-272. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750090038003
Abstract

IN THE present state of our knowledge about noice-induced hearing loss, there are two factors as yet imperfectly understood. These are (1) the onset of loss and (2) the rate of progression of loss. Onset is meant here to be the incidence of loss in a known population or sample of a population when the exposure variables are known; rate of progress refers to the rapidity of increase in loss after it has been detected in the person under known exposure conditions.

It is difficult to elucidate these factors directly from the many fine studies which have been conducted on noise and its effects upon hearing acuity. As a rule, the exposure conditions described have been insufficiently quantified. In addition, the losses disclosed have often been assigned to noise by implication, i. e., other etiologies have not necessarily been excluded, either as primary or as contributing causes. We are, therefore,

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