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Article
November 1951

STURGE-WEBER DISEASE AS AN OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL PROBLEM

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology.

AMA Arch Otolaryngol. 1951;54(5):542-546. doi:10.1001/archotol.1951.03750110078011
Abstract

HEMANGIOMA about the head and neck is in itself not a rarity in the field of otolaryngology. Weaver1 recently reported three cases: In one hemangioma involved the external ear; in another, the middle ear and mastoid, while in a third it occurred in the ethmoid region. However, a case of hemangioma of the external ear, face, and pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa of sufficient extent to become a source of respiratory obstruction is sufficiently uncommon to warrant its presentation.

LITERARY EVOLUTION OF THE DISEASE  Sturge,2 in 1879, first described a case of an epileptiform seizure (which he attributed to a lesion of one of the vasomotor centers of the brain) in an adult having a "port-wine stain" of the face. Kalischer,3 in 1897, first reported on the various changes in the brain of a child who had both a port-wine mark on the face and scalp and a

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